Bolt Food is a food delivery service from Estonian ride-hailing company Bolt.

Bolt

Competition in Europe’s food delivery market is getting even more heated.

Uber rival Bolt announced Wednesday it will launch a food delivery service in Tallinn, Estonia, where it is headquartered. The Estonian start-up said it would expand the service to Latvia, Lithuania, and South Africa later this year before launching in more markets in Europe and Africa in 2020.

Bolt, formerly known as Taxify, is entering an already-crowded field of competitors in the European food delivery market. Uber Eats and Amazon-backed Deliveroo are aggressively expanding across the region, while Britain’s Just Eat recently agreed to merge with Amsterdam-based Takeaway.com to create the biggest food delivery company outside of China.

Bolt Chief Product Officer Jevgeni Kabanov said in a press release Wednesday the company’s strategy with food delivery will be to build on its existing 25 million users and offer lower prices compared to competitors. The company has taken a similar approach in the ride-hailing market by offering steep rider discounts and higher driver commissions. Bolt said the food delivery service would be available through a separate app called Bolt Food.

The Estonian unicorn, which was valued at $1 billion last year, currently operates in 30 countries. Its investors include Chinese ride-hailing firm Didi Chuxing and German automaker Daimler.

Ride-hailing companies have struggled to cook up profits in the food delivery market thanks to high overhead costs. Earlier this month, Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said he doesn’t expect the company’s Eats business to be profitable in the next two years.

Ren Zhengfei, founder and chief executive officer of Huawei Technologies Co., speaks during an interview at the company’s headquarters in Shenzhen, China, on Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019.

Qilai Shen | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Huawei is facing a “life or death crisis” amid continued pressure from the U.S. government, its founder and CEO told employees, as he laid out a strategy for the Chinese telecommunications giant going forward.

In a memo to employees of Huawei’s networking division, Ren Zhengfei described the company’s current situation as a “battle.” Ren is well-known for using military language in his communications with employees.

In May, the company was put on a U.S. blacklist — or the so-called Entity List — which restricts American businesses from selling to the Chinese firm. Huawei relies on a lot of American technology from software to hardware.

But on Monday, the U.S. administration extended a reprieve for the telecommunications company for 90 days. U.S. businesses can sell specific products to Huawei during the 90-day period.

“Now that the company is at a life or death crisis, our first priority is to encourage all crew to make contributions, and the second is to choose and promote talents, to add ‘new blood’ to our system,” Ren said, according to a CNBC translation of the memo. He said there will be “new blood” in the company in three to five years.

The Huawei boss laid out plans to bring more efficiencies to the organization. This included simplifying the reporting structure, cutting down on surplus staff, axing repetitive jobs and moving managers to other positions as required.

He also urged staff to make sure people pay attention to the quality of the contracts they are signing with customers to ensure Huawei is paid on time and does not suffer any cash flow issues.

Ren added that Huawei would also accelerate the purchase of important equipment in order to meet customers’ demand.

‘Security threat’ to the US

The Chinese telecommunications firm has been increasingly caught up in the trade war between the U.S. and China.

As a result, Huawei has been trying to wean itself off reliance on American technology. The company designs its own processors for its smartphones and recently released an operating system for various devices called Harmony OS. Richard Yu, CEO of Huawei’s consumer division said that it would prefer to continue to using Google’s Android operating system, but if it was not able to, it could switch to HarmonyOS “immediately.”

President Donald Trump has sent mixed signals over the last few months about the fate of Huawei in the U.S.

In May, he said that it was “possible that Huawei would be included in a trade deal.” But this weekend, Trump said he didn’t want to do business with Huawei “because it is a national security threat.”

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, however, said the message from the administration is clear.

“President Trump has been unambiguous. I don’t think there’s a mixed message at all,” Pompeo told CNBC. “The threat of having Chinese telecom systems inside of American networks or inside of networks around the world presents an enormous risk — a national security risk. Our mission set is to find a way to reduce that risk, to take that risk down as much as we possibly can.”

The U.S. has said that Huawei products carry a risk of allowing Chinese authorities to spy on Americans via backdoors, something the Chinese tech company has repeatedly denied.

Pat Gelsinger, CEO of VMware

Tony Avelar | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Enterprise software company VMware on Tuesday confirmed that it has acquired Intrinsic, a small San Francisco security start-up. Terms of the deal weren’t disclosed.

The acquisition represents another step in VMware’s embrace of cloud technologies, despite VMware’s legacy of providing products that companies can use to deploy software in their own data centers.

Intrinsic sought to help software developers securely tap serverless computing, an increasingly popular approach that involves automatically triggering a system to operate when certain things happen. Intrinsic’s technology lets users set policies about how these systems can operate.

“This acquisition brings us unique expertise and technology as we look to expand our VMware AppDefense platform into the public cloud,” a spokesperson said.

VMware shares have nearly doubled since it formed a major partnership with Amazon Web Services, the market-leading public cloud provider, in 2016. Intrinsic’s technology works with serverless offerings from Amazon, as well as Microsoft and Google.

Intrinsic was founded in 2015 and was formerly known as GitStar. The start-up has about 10 employees, according to LinkedIn, and raised capital from venture investors including Andreessen Horowitz, First Round Capital and NEA.

Last week VMware disclosed that it was in discussions with Pivotal about a business combination. Earlier this year VMware bought Bitnami, a privately held company that made it easy to deploy preliminary software on top of cloud-based servers.

“I have plenty of capacity to acquire,” VMware CEO Pat Gelsinger told CNBC in an interview last month.

WATCH: VMware CEO Pat Gelsinger on earnings, cloud partnerships and more

London’s Old Street roundabout, often dubbed “Silicon Roundabout.”

Chris Ratcliffe | Bloomberg | Getty Images

British technology start-ups have attracted more foreign investment since the start of the year than they did throughout all of 2018, according to fresh figures published Wednesday.

U.S. and Asian venture capital investors poured $3.7 billion into U.K. tech companies in the first seven months of 2019, research from industry group Tech Nation and data firm Dealroom showed. Last year, U.K. start-ups raised $2.9 billion from American and Asian investors.

The eye-watering sum was boosted by nine-figure deals from capital-rich companies like Amazon and SoftBank. In May, Amazon led a $575 million funding round for Deliveroo — although that was hit with a warning from the U.K. competition regulator — while SoftBank’s notable U.K. investments include $800 million for Greensill and $390 million for OakNorth.

Including domestic sources of cash, $6.7 billion has been invested into private British tech firms overall in 2019, Tech Nation said, adding that figure could rise to a record $11 billion by the end of the year. The organization said U.S. corporate venture capital funding for U.K. start-ups has risen by 3% in the last six years, while Asian corporate funding is up 20%.

“It’s evidence for us that there’s growing interest for emerging technologies that are gaining a lot of traction in the U.K. from foreign investors,” George Windsor, Tech Nation’s head of insights, told CNBC in a phone interview. “This shows us the U.K. is continuing to perform strongly on the global stage, and for us this is just the start.”

The U.K. pulled in the largest amount of foreign funding for tech companies versus other European countries, the data showed. For example, German start-ups bagged about $800 million from U.S. and Asian investors in the first half of the year, while French firms brought in only $500 million.

One particular bright spot for the U.K.’s tech industry has been financial technology, with plenty of capital flowing into start-ups like Monzo, Checkout and GoCardless. Monzo is backed by U.S. payments firm Stripe, while GoCardless counts tech giants Alphabet and Salesforce as investors.

But Tech Nation’s Windsor said the country has managed to maintain a diverse mix of start-ups in terms of sectors, with the research highlighting health tech firm Babylon and energy supplier Ovo Energy as examples of other companies attracting large sums of money. British artificial intelligence and cybersecurity firms are also an attractive bet for foreign investors, he said.

And while Brexit has been a source of uncertainty for businesses across the U.K., Windsor said it isn’t at the top of tech entrepreneurs’ minds: “Entrepreneurs had problems before Brexit, and they’ll just get about solving them. Brexit is too nebulous a thing for them to tackle as an entrepreneur.”

London’s Old Street roundabout, often dubbed “Silicon Roundabout.”

Chris Ratcliffe | Bloomberg | Getty Images

British technology start-ups have attracted more foreign investment since the start of the year than they did throughout all of 2018, according to fresh figures published Wednesday.

U.S. and Asian venture capital investors poured $3.7 billion into U.K. tech companies in the first seven months of 2019, research from industry group Tech Nation and data firm Dealroom showed. Last year, U.K. start-ups raised $2.9 billion from American and Asian investors.

The eye-watering sum was boosted by nine-figure deals from capital-rich companies like Amazon and SoftBank. In May, Amazon led a $575 million funding round for Deliveroo — although that was hit with a warning from the U.K. competition regulator — while SoftBank’s notable U.K. investments include $800 million for Greensill and $390 million for OakNorth.

Including domestic sources of cash, $6.7 billion has been invested into private British tech firms overall in 2019, Tech Nation said, adding that figure could rise to a record $11 billion by the end of the year. The organization said U.S. corporate venture capital funding for U.K. start-ups has risen by 3% in the last six years, while Asian corporate funding is up 20%.

“It’s evidence for us that there’s growing interest for emerging technologies that are gaining a lot of traction in the U.K. from foreign investors,” George Windsor, Tech Nation’s head of insights, told CNBC in a phone interview. “This shows us the U.K. is continuing to perform strongly on the global stage, and for us this is just the start.”

The U.K. pulled in the largest amount of foreign funding for tech companies versus other European countries, the data showed. For example, German start-ups bagged about $800 million from U.S. and Asian investors in the first half of the year, while French firms brought in only $500 million.

One particular bright spot for the U.K.’s tech industry has been financial technology, with plenty of capital flowing into start-ups like Monzo, Checkout and GoCardless. Monzo is backed by U.S. payments firm Stripe, while GoCardless counts tech giants Alphabet and Salesforce as investors.

But Tech Nation’s Windsor said the country has managed to maintain a diverse mix of start-ups in terms of sectors, with the research highlighting health tech firm Babylon and energy supplier Ovo Energy as examples of other companies attracting large sums of money. British artificial intelligence and cybersecurity firms are also an attractive bet for foreign investors, he said.

And while Brexit has been a source of uncertainty for businesses across the U.K., Windsor said it isn’t at the top of tech entrepreneurs’ minds: “Entrepreneurs had problems before Brexit, and they’ll just get about solving them. Brexit is too nebulous a thing for them to tackle as an entrepreneur.”

Elon Musk, Chairman of SolarCity and CEO of Tesla Motors, speaks at SolarCity’s Inside Energy Summit in Manhattan.

Rashid Umar Abbas | Reuters

When Tesla acquired SolarCity in 2016, the $2.6 billion deal was criticized by many as a bailout by Elon Musk and for Elon Musk, who was the biggest shareholder of both the electric carmaker and the solar panel distributor.

In an explosive 114-page lawsuit filed on Tuesday, Walmart piled onto the controversy, highlighting the familial ties between Tesla and SolarCity as the underpinnings of a flawed merger that allegedly produced shoddy craftsmanship and led to fires at seven Walmart stores.

“On information and belief, when Tesla purchased SolarCity to bail out the flailing company (whose executives included two of Tesla CEO Elon Musk’s first cousins), Tesla failed to correct SolarCity’s chaotic installation practices or to adopt adequate maintenance protocols, which would have been particularly important in light of the improper installation practices,” Walmart said in the suit filed in New York. SolarCity co-founders Lyndon Rive and Peter Rive are Musk’s cousins.

Already faced with a slumping stock price from dozens of lawsuits and investigations, store closings, delayed loan repayments and the departure of key executives, the Walmart suit lands at a particularly difficult time for Tesla and Musk. Specifically in regards to SolarCity, Musk was slated to be deposed earlier this month in a complaint brought by shareholders over the deal.

After the SolarCity deal, by far Tesla’s biggest ever, the company had plans for a factory in Buffalo, New York, that it was sharing with battery manufacturing partner Panasonic. The facility was intended to focus on solar panels but turned into a site for making parts for its Supercharger and energy products. Tesla has reportedly taken $62 million in impairment charges after ditching research and development work related to batteries and solar technology.

Walmart’s suit against Tesla alleges breach of contract, gross negligence and failure to live up to industry standards. The retailer is asking Tesla to remove solar panels from over 240 store locations where they’ve been installed and to pay damages its says are related to fires caused by those panels.

Some of the most detrimental claims in the suit relate to employees’ lack of “solar training and knowledge” and inability to identify and properly install basic equipment. According to the suit, Tesla’s own inspection reports revealed “improper wire management, including abraded and hanging wires,” as well as “poor grounding” and “solar panel modules that were broken or contained dangerous hotspots.”

The name SolarCity shows up 46 times in the lawsuit, which alleges the company had a failed business model, stemming from a goal to speed up revenue growth at all costs.

“Walmart’s experience bears out Tesla, Inc.’s and Tesla’s inability to turn around and bail out the solar panel operations acquired from SolarCity,” the suit says. 

Tesla shares dropped more than 1% after hours on the news.

Representatives from Walmart and Tesla didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment.

— Lora Kolodny contributed to this report

WATCH: Walmart sues Tesla after solar panels on stores catch fire

SpaceX owner and Tesla CEO Elon Musk gestures during a conversation at the E3 gaming convention in Los Angeles, June 13, 2019.

Mike Blake | Reuters

Walmart is suing Elon Musk’s electric vehicle and clean energy company after Tesla solar panels atop seven of the retailer’s stores allegedly caught fire, according a court filing.

The Walmart suit alleges breach of contract, gross negligence and failure to live up to industry standards. Walmart is asking Tesla to remove solar panels from more than 240 Walmart locations where they have been installed, and to pay damages related to all the fires Walmart says that Tesla caused.

The Walmart suit, filed in the state of New York, alleges that: “As of November 2018, no fewer than seven Walmart stores had experienced fires due to Tesla’s solar systems-including the four fires described above and three others that had occurred earlier.” The filing details evacuations, damaged property and inventory.

Tesla’s stock dropped more than 1% after hours on the news. Walmart and Tesla did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Walmart claimed, among myriad complaints, that “Tesla routinely deployed individuals to inspect the solar systems who lacked basic solar training and knowledge.” In the suit, they also alleged that Tesla failed to ground its solar and electrical systems properly, and that Tesla-installed solar panels on-site at Walmart stores contained a high number of defects that were visible to the naked eye, and which Tesla should have found and repaired before they led to fires.

Tesla has been trying to revive its solar business of late.

On Sunday, CEO Elon Musk announced in a string of tweets that customers in some states can now rent Tesla’s residential, solar rooftop systems without a contract. The offer is available in six states, and will cost customers at least $50 a month (or $65 a month in California).

Although Musk touted the ease of cancelling a rented roof at anytime, the fine print on Tesla’s website mentions a $1,500 fee to take out the solar panels and restore the customer’s roof.

In the second quarter of 2019, Tesla installed a mere 29 megawatts of solar, a record low for the company in a single quarter. In its heyday, Tesla’s solar division (formerly SolarCity) installed over 200 megawatts in a single quarter.

When Tesla acquired SolarCity in 2016 for around $2.6 billion the deal caused controversy that continues to this day.

SolarCity was founded and run by Musk’s first cousins, Peter and Lyndon Rive. Prior to Tesla’s acquisition, Musk owned about one-fifth of SolarCity stock, which was valued around $575 million at the end of 2015. While SolarCity had been a successful solar installer in the prior decade, its stock was plummeting, and debt had ballooned to $3.4 billion before the deal closed.

In an investor presentation meant to drum up support for the acquisition, Musk showed off what appeared to be sleek, glass solar roof tiles. Rather than bulky panels, they looked like premium shingles. The solar roof tiles are still not widely distributed or mass-manufactured.

Jordan Novet contributed to this report.

Follow @CNBCtech on Twitter for the latest tech industry news.

U.S. Assistant Attorney General for Antitrust Makan Delrahim testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee during an oversight hearing on the enforcement of antitrust laws in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill October 03, 2018 in Washington, DC.

Chip Somodevilla | Getty Images

A top antitrust official at the Department of Justice said Tuesday that “a couple of dozen states” are interested in investigating Big Tech for antitrust concerns.

Makan Delrahim, the assistant attorney general for the antitrust division, said a large bipartisan group of state attorneys general spoke to the Justice Department about starting a joint investigation into technology companies.

“I think it’s probably safe to say more than a dozen. A couple of dozen state attorneys general have expressed an interest in the subject matter,” Delrahim said at the Technology Policy Institute’s Aspen Forum.

The Justice Department announced last month that it is opening a review into potential antitrust concerns in the major online platforms, saying the review will “consider the widespread concerns that consumers, businesses, and entrepreneurs have expressed about search, social media, and some retail services online.”

The Justice Department did not name specific companies that were under review, but shares of Amazon, Alphabet and Facebook all slumped immediately following the July announcement. The stocks of all three companies were down less than 1% on Tuesday, along with major market indices.

Delrahim said the Justice Department intends to work together with the states on their probe, adding that cooperation benefits all parties involved. There is not a set timeline for the investigation, Delrahim said.

Major technology companies have drawn scrutiny from federal lawmakers and regulators about how they handle user data and disseminate information. The skepticism has spread to new projects, with Facebook’s proposed cryptocurrency, Libra, receiving pushback from Washington soon after it was announced.

The Wall Street Journal first reported the news of the state effort. It is not clear which states would be part of the investigation.

WATCH: How US antitrust law works and what it means for Big Tech

U.S. Assistant Attorney General for Antitrust Makan Delrahim testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee during an oversight hearing on the enforcement of antitrust laws in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill October 03, 2018 in Washington, DC.

Chip Somodevilla | Getty Images

A top antitrust official at the Department of Justice said Tuesday that “a couple of dozen states” are interested in investigating Big Tech for antitrust concerns.

Makan Delrahim, the assistant attorney general for the antitrust division, said a large group of bipartisan state attorneys general have spoken to the Justice Department about starting their own investigation into technology companies.

“I think it’s probably safe to say more than a dozen. A couple of dozen state attorneys general have expressed an interest in the subject matter,” Delrahim said at the Technology Policy Institute’s Aspen Forum.

The Justice Department announced last month that it is opening a review into potential antitrust concerns in the major online platforms, saying the review will “consider the widespread concerns that consumers, businesses, and entrepreneurs have expressed about search, social media, and some retail services online.”

The Justice Department did not name specific companies that were under review, but shares of Amazon, Alphabet and Facebook all slumped immediately following the July announcement. The stocks of all three companies were down less than 1% on Tuesday, along with major market indices.

Delrahim said the Justice Department intends to work together with the states on the probe, adding that cooperation benefits all parties involved. There is not a set timeline for the investigation, Delrahim said.

Major technology companies have drawn scrutiny from federal lawmakers and regulators about how they handle user data and disseminate information. The skepticism has spread to new projects, with Facebook’s proposed cryptocurrency, Libra, receiving pushback from Washington soon after it was announced.

The Wall Street Journal first reported the news of the state effort. It is not clear which states would be part of the investigation.

WATCH: How US antitrust law works and what it means for Big Tech

The president of Mastercard‘s North American operations told CNBC on Tuesday that Apple‘s new no-number, “digital first” credit card is bringing enhanced security to users.

“Not having a card number on the physical card, if the consumer chooses to get that, helps [with security] certainly because somebody can’t just write that down and take it,” Mastercard’s Craig Vosburg said on “Squawk Alley. “

Earlier Tuesday, Apple announced the official launch of its new Apple card, an iPhone-integrated credit card partnered with Goldman Sachs and Mastercard.

Unlike standard credit cards, the Apple card doesn’t come with a sixteen-digit number and the company encourages users not to swipe for transactions.

Vosburg explained that this product is more secure because users get a one-time-use number in the Wallet app. “The real key to the enhanced security here is happening behind the scenes where we’re tokenizing the card credentials.”

He added, “We’re taking the digital representation of that sixteen-digit number and scrambling [it] into a code that only we and Goldman Sachs can recognize. We know where it’s meant to be used. We know it’s meant to be used with that Apple device and if it shows up somewhere else, we know it’s been compromised and we can kill it.”

IPhone users can apply for the card through the Wallet app and start using it right away with Apple Pay on apps and in stores. The credit card can only be signed up for on an iPhone and the majority of transactions and interface take place on the phone. The main purpose of Apple’s latest product is to keep users in the Apple ecosystem and most importantly, to make it harder for people to switch over to Android.

According to Vosburg, the “digital first card” utilizes “Mastercard’s technology in conjunction with Apple and Goldman Sachs” to bring and create a “new kind of consumer experience.”

“It aligns with the way so many consumers are living their lives, in particular, consumers who identify closely with Apple’s brand and the Apple ecosystem,” he said. “We want to be able to have payment capabilities closely aligned with the way they are living their lives.”

Following the launch of Apple card, Apple shares rose more than 1%.